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Secrets To Success: Amanda Dambuza


Amanda Dambuza, Founder and CEO of Uyandiswa.



When it comes to entrepreneurship South African women are bolder than their international counterparts.

At least that is according to the Veuve Clicquot International Women Entrepreneurship Barometer, which has revealed that 70% of SA women aspire to become entrepreneurs.


The international barometer was unveiled by Maison Veuve Clicquot at the recent Veuve Clicquot X Women experience.


We caught up with one of the speakers Amanda Dambuza, Founder and CEO of Uyandiswa.

Q: What is the one piece of advice that has served you well in your entrepreneurship journey?


A: The sole purpose of your business must be to generate cash...then you can fulfil all your purpose’s desires. Founded in 2013, Uyandiswa is a Level 1 B-BBEE and 100% Black Woman Owned (BWO), value-adding company.


Based in Johannesburg, the company has been setting up project management offices and executing projects for large blue-chip organisations since inception across Africa.


Q: You are part business speaker, part motivational speaker. How does this reflect your management style?


A: I am a very inclusive leader, more inspirational, servant-leader than authoritative. I believe the people I work with must be well-rounded human beings.


I really do my best to inspire them to reach for whatever dream they wish for, to know that there are no limits to their potential. So much so in fact that I celebrate when people leave my company for bigger and better opportunities because it means I have been able to give them a platform that can set up their next.


I encourage, support and inspire them to be their best, to just go for it. It does not mean I am a walk-over. I am tough on performance just not the person.


Q: In an interview with Bizcommunity, you stated “Once you decide you are made for business, then plan and execute. Stop waiting for people to validate your dreams. Just go for it.” What are the essential steps to creating a business as a first -time founder?


A: Many technical things like putting together a credible budget or a business plan can be researched and learned but here are some non-negotiables: Firstly, understand that an idea is not a business.


You must be willing to invest your own money into seeing it come to fruition, record some success before asking for others to invest their money into it. If you keep thinking and working on Plan B then you may as well stay where you are.


Undying self-belief and the absolute resolution that your business is the only plan and that you are the only plan should drive you and it really puts you in a different league. Do not be afraid of failure. It is your attitude towards it that determines its long-term effects.


Don't miss the other profiles in our Secrets of Success series with with Kholisa Thomas, Founder of www.artfull.co and Kholisa Thomas Art Advisory and Lala Tuku Founder and Director of Corporate Icons Media and Co-Chair of Africa Rising International Film Festival.